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Friday, April 14, 2006, 02:00 pm PT (05:00 pm ET)

Jobs declines to write foreword to Wozniak's autobiography

Apple Computer chief executive Steve Jobs has reportedly changed his mind about writing the foreword to the upcoming autobiography of old pal and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak.

"I was a little disappointed — Steve Jobs had indicated he'd write a forward. But he'd never written a forward before and I said, 'Just write what we were like back then,' Wozniak revealed in an interview with Seattle Times reporter Kim Peterson. "We sent him the book and he said, 'Oh, I saw some excerpts, and I'm going to decline writing the forward.'"

"I don't know why" he declined, explained Woz, "because I'm nice to him, so there must have been something he didn't like."

This isn't the first time that Jobs has taken issue with the publication of a book. Last April he had Apple pull all books released by John Wiley & Sons from the company's retail stores in protest of an unauthorized biography of himself about to be released by the publisher.

Although Woz says Jobs deserves a "great deal" of the credit for Apple's recent turnaround, he admits the two are no longer close friends. "Even when Apple really got started we weren't close friends because he had a different motivation in the company, which was to run a company, and mine was just to be a top engineer that did clever, clever projects," he said. "So we almost never saw each other in the company."

In the same interview, Woz was asked what he thinks about Apple's new Boot Camp software that lets Intel Mac owners dual-boot into the Windows operating system. "I don't think anything of it at all," he responded. "You know, people say a bunch of PC people will now buy Macs. No. What I really want is just a window that I can go back and forth instantly. I don't have to reboot."

Woz says he currently uses Microsoft's Virtual PC when he needs to run Windows. Although he calls it "slow," it doesn't require a reboot to switch between Mac and Windows applications, he explained.