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Tuesday, May 31, 2011, 10:00 pm PT (01:00 am ET)

Google, Apple renew partnership for maps, search in iPhone

Google Executive Chairman and former CEO Eric Schmidt revealed Tuesday that his company had reached a deal with Apple to continue providing its maps and search technology for the iPhone.

Speaking at the D9 conference organized by All Things D, Schmidt said that Google's relationship with Apple had gotten "rough" as competition between Android and iOS heated up, but they remained good partners in certain businesses, Reuters reports.

Schmidt put to rest rumors that Apple planned to abandon Google's maps and search technology in the iPhone. According to the executive, the two companies recently renewed their partnership to continue to provide services for the iPhone. "We just renewed our map and search agreements with Apple, and we hope those continue for a long time," he said. Last year, it was suggested that Google pays Apple as much as $100 million a year in a revenue sharing deal for searches made on the iPhone.

Schmidt also talked candidly about his company's rivalry with Facebook. "We tried very hard to partner with Facebook ," he noted. "They were unwilling to do the deal." In hindsight, Schmidt said he would have pushed harder to compete with Facebook. "I screwed up," he admitted.

Google co-founder Larry Page took over for Schmidt as CEO in April. Schmidt formerly served on Apple's board of directors before stepping down due to a conflict of interest.

Apple does, however, appear to still be working on building out its own Maps team. In March, AppleInsider discovered a job listing for an iOS Maps Application Developer that would help "radically improve" Apple's location-based services. Last year, Apple began using its own Maps location databases, though it still relies on Google for the maps themselves.

Last month, Apple revealed that it is collecting anonymous traffic data in order to build a "crowd-sourced traffic database," though it was not immediately clear whether the use of the word "traffic" referred to network data or transportation.