Just days let to get the lowest prices of the year on Macs & iPads: Apple Price Guides updated Dec 21st (exclusive coupons)

HTC has no intention to settle with Apple in wake of Samsung loss

Smartphone maker HTC plans to continue its patent infringement battle with Apple, even though Apple just earned a significant victory against another Android-based handset manufacturer, Samsung.

Cher Wang, chairwoman of HTC, revealed that her company has no intention of reaching a settlement with Apple, according to DigiTimes. She said that HTC remains confident in the face of patent infringement complaints from Apple, even though Samsung was found by a California jury to have violated Apple's patented inventions.

HTC also remains confident in the Google Android mobile operating system after Samsung's setback. Wang said she believes Samsung's loss is not necessarily a result of Android itself.

Wang cited her company's ability to innovate as a key element in fending off patent infringement allegations from Apple. Once a rising star in the mobile space, HTC has recently faltered, failing to replicate the kind of success Apple has had in the high-end smartphone market.

HTC and Apple are engaged in a series of lawsuits in which each has accused the other of patent infringement. The litigation, which began in 2010, was predicted to become a "long and bloody battle" between the two companies.

HTC One X

HTC's flagship HTC One X smartphone.


HTC's stance on the Apple-Samsung lawsuit is similar to Google, which issued a statement this week saying Samsung's loss didn't relate to the core of the Android mobile operating system.

"Most of these don't relate to the core Android operating system and several are being re-examined by the U.S. Patent Office," Google said.

Despite confidence shown by HTC and Google, some industry watchers believe Apple's victory over Samsung could lead to a lucrative royalty stream for Apple from Android devices. The jury in the Apple-Samsung suit determined that Samsung owes Apple nearly $1.05 billion in damages.