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Friday, May 28, 2010, 12:50 pm PT (03:50 pm ET)

Apple expected to sell 700K+ iPads overseas, beating the Mac

Early reports suggest that Apple has sold most of its first run of international iPad shipments, which has lead one analyst to predict that the iPad will outsell the Mac internationally this quarter.

Mike Abramsky with RBC Capital Markets said Friday that he believes between 600,000 and 700,000 iPads will be sold overseas in June, though the number could go even higher. If that forecast is accurate, it would well exceed the 500,000 Macs expected to be sold in June.

"Industry contact feedback and previously published surveys point to strong international demand, supported by media reports of long lineups at Apple stores, and strong demand for iPads," Abramsky wrote. "iPads appear to be stocked out already at some stores and resellers, particularly in countries like Japan, Australia, and U.K. Online availability has been further delayed, to a vague 'June,' from June 7 (prior to which was May 28)."

He noted that the nine countries where the iPad launched on Friday are Apple's strongest international markets, accounting for about 50 percent of the Cupertino, Calif., company's overseas revenue. And yet, still 78 of the 88 countries where the iPhone is available have yet to receive the iPad.

If Abramsky's predictions prove true, it would be a continuation of the trend started in the U.S., where the iPad has had blockbusters sales since it was first introduced in early April. Last week, Abramsky said he believes Apple is selling more than 200,000 iPads per week in the U.S., nearly doubling the estimate 110,000 Macs sold stateside every 7 days.

RBC Capital Markets


In all, the analyst sees Apple selling 8.1 million iPads in calendar year 2010, as supply issues are eventually addressed and Apple begins to meet demand.

"Over the coming months, we believe Apple will further ramp production to overcome initial supply shortages," he said.