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Wednesday, April 03, 2013, 09:28 am PT (12:28 pm ET)

SkyDrive for iOS update suggests Microsoft & Apple resolved their dispute

After months of behind-the-scenes hold-ups, an update to SkyDrive for iOS arrived in the App Store on Wednesday, signaling that Microsoft and Apple have apparently made amends.

SkyDrive


It was first revealed in December that Apple and Microsoft were at odds over in-app subscription fees for Microsoft's SkyDrive cloud storage service. Late last year, Microsoft confirmed it had seen a "delay in approval" of the updated version of SkyDrive for iOS, and said it was "in contact with Apple" in hopes of finding a solution.

Though no indication was given as to what changed, SkyDrive for iOS version 3.0 arrived in the App Store on Wednesday. The new software adds support for the iPhone 5 and iPad mini, and also features updated icons and user experience. Other additions, according to Microsoft, include:
  • The ability to download full resolution photos to your iPhone or iPad
  • Improved support that makes it easier to open and upload SkyDrive files with other iOS apps
  • The option to control upload/download photo size and the capability to retain photo meta data when uploading to SkyDrive

Prior to the release of SkyDrive 3.0, the last update for the iOS application came in June of 2012. The software allows users to access, manage and share SkyDrive files on the go.

Despite the arrival of SkyDrive 3.0 in the App Store, there's no sign that Microsoft and Apple have also worked out the issues that were reportedly holding up the arrival of Office 365 for iOS. The two sides were allegedly at odds over subscription fees, as Apple takes an ongoing 30 percent cut of all subscriptions sold through sanctioned App Store applications.

Microsoft's Office 365 is a service that allows access to a suite of applications, including SkyDrive. The Redmond, Wash., software company reportedly balked at Apple's 30 percent cut taken on all in-app purchases and subscriptions.