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Friday, January 25, 2013, 04:31 pm PT (07:31 pm ET)

Samsung tries to get peek at iOS source code in Korean patent suit

In a request to the Seoul Central District Court on Friday, Samsung asked to see the source code for Apple's latest iOS, claiming that it needed access to the extremely sensitive data to confirm that the operating system infringes on a software patent.

Notification Center


In response, Apple vehemently denied the request, calling it "ridiculous" as the source code is among the company's most guarded assets, reports The Korea Times.

Court officials quoted Apple counsel as saying, "[The request] doesn’t make any sense. Samsung is saying that we should give up protecting our most important data." The court asked that Apple provide its software designers and engineers for testimony, but the company refused.

The request comes one day after Samsung lawyers said it would be impossible to determine whether the Korean tech giant's patent was infringed upon without the source code. Apple reportedly called the plea "insane."

At issue is Apple's implementation of Notification Center, which allows users to swipe down from the top of any iDevice screen to access a host of updates including weather, email and push notifications, among others. Samsung first filed suit against the Cupertino company in December, claiming Notification Center infringed on patented technology.

Apple introduced Notification Center with iOS 5 in 2011, some time after a similar solution was seen in handsets running Google's Android. Earlier this month AppleInsider discovered an Apple patent application for the iOS notification system, but it is unclear if the filing has any relation to Samsung's Korean suit.

Samsung claimed that it patented an identical feature in November 2006 that was later used in Android devices including the company's Galaxy line of smartphones and tablets. Apple rebutted and accused Samsung of taking ownership of a technology already in use throughout the industry.

The Seoul court did not issue a ruling regarding the matter and an official timeline for a determination has yet to be announced.