Pre-Order your new iMac now from MacMall (ships Oct 23) & save hundreds in tax: Apple Price Guides updated Oct 24th (exclusive coupons)
The New AppleInsider App
 


Tuesday, October 30, 2012, 12:34 pm PT (03:34 pm ET)

ARM announces 64-bit Cortex-A50 mobile processors coming in 2014

ARM on Tuesday unveiled new its next-generation of high-performance, power sipping 64-bit chips — CPUs that could power future devices from companies like Apple as soon as 2014.

ARM's new Cortex-A50 processor series is based on the ARMv8 architecture. The series will initially include the Cortex-A53 and Cortex-A57 processors with new energy-efficient 64-bit processing technology.

ARM said its new system-on-chips will be available for use in products ranging from smartphones to servers. The new chips will be 64-bit-capable, but will also support 32-bit software.

ARM said the addition of 64-bit execution to its A50 chip line will "enable new opportunities in networking, server, and high-performance computing." The new chips are expected to boost smartphone and tablet speeds while also reducing power consumption.

The Cortex-A57 will be the most advanced high-performance applications processor, while the Cortex-A53 has the distinction of being the world's smallest 64-bit processor, and ARM's most power-efficient application processor.

A6


"Consumers expect a personalized mobile experience, integrating their daily lives, with seamless connectivity providing access to vast amounts of information," said Simon Segars, executive vice president, processor and physical IP divisions, ARM. :The ARM ecosystem will continue its rate of unprecedented innovation to enable diverse platforms.

"This will deliver an era of transformational computing, from mobile through to the infrastructure and servers that support consumers’ connected, mobile lifestyles. This will create massive opportunities for market expansion and a revolution in user experiences."

Currently, Apple's iPhone, iPad, iPod touch and Apple TV are all powered by custom chips based on ARM's reference designs. Apple's work in this area has grown over the years, as the new A6 chip in the iPhone 5 represents Apple's first custom-designed CPU core.

The A6 chip is based on Apple's won ARMv7-based processor design, and is not based on ARM's Cortex-A9 or Cortex-A15 designs. The chip features a gigabyte of RAM with two CPU and three GPU cores, and Apple's first-ever control of the design allowed the company to customize the performance as they chose.