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Apple's in-store pickup program launches in San Francisco

Apple on Wednesday began offering customers in San Francisco the ability to order a product online and pick it up in a local retail store.

When checking out from Apple's online store, a new "Pick up" option is available, from which users can select a store in San Francisco, Calif. It also states that the in-store pickup option is "coming soon to a U.S. Apple Store near you."

The "Select an Apple Store" feature allows users to enter their zip code and find a local Apple Store, though for now the program is limited to San Francisco. Users who pick up their order at an Apple Retail Store get Personal Setup for any new Apple product.

Products listed as "Available now" at the store can be picked up within an hour. Customers can also designate someone other than themselves to pick up an order.

Word first surfaced on Monday that Apple was planning to launch its in-store pickup option in its online store. The pilot program was tested internally at the company under the codename "Sherwood."

In addition to in-store pickup, Apple's retail stores are also expected to begin accepting returns of online orders. By doing this, customers can avoid shipping an item back to Apple for the return process.

Apple began offering an in-store pickup option in a limited capacity in 2009, with a Christmastime "Reserve and Pick Up" program. That was restricted to specific products: the iPhone, iPod and MacBook lineups, Mac mini, iMac and Mac Pro. It did not include accessories.

In-store pickup


But Apple's new in-store pickup option applies to any product available in Apple's online store, including accessories such as iPhone and iPad cases.

Apple's retail operations has become a very important part of the company's business model. The company revealed in its last quarterly earnings report that it plans to expand many of its retail locations in the U.S., as officials believe the current stores are now "too constrained" to properly serve the high volume of customers they experience.