Apple joins First Movers Coalition to cut carbon emissions

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Apple has joined the First Movers Coalition, an initiative by the U.S. government and the World Economic Government to help improve the environment by buying low-carbon products and reforming their supply chains.

Formally launching at COP26 on November 4, the First Movers Coalition is a partnership between the World Economic Forum and the US Office of the Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry. The goal of the initiative is to meet climate goals, by reducing carbon emissions and being more environmentally minded.

Part of the effort has a group of companies committing to buying low-carbon products by 2030, with the initial focus being on the shipping, aviation, steel, and trucking sectors, which are deemed "hard to abate" by the WEF. Four more sectors will be added to the list in 2022.

Apple is among the companies that will be taking part in the coalition, which Apple VP of Environment, Policy, and Social Initiatives Lisa Jackson confirmed on Twitter. Saying "We must each do our part to protect the planet," Jackson says Apple is joining the group to "help accelerate new decarbonization technologies."

Apple has previously pledged to achieve a 100% carbon neutral footprint across its entire business by 2030. This includes its own retail and global corporate operations, manufacturing supply chain, and the entire product life cycle.

"The United States and World Economic Forum are launching the First Movers Coalition...[which] is starting with more than two dozen of the world's largest and most innovative companies. The Coalition represents eight major sectors that comprise 30% of global emissions that we now are dealing with," said President Joe Biden on Tuesday at COP26.

He added "These companies will be critical partners in pushing for viable alternatives to decarbonize these industrial sectors and more."