Apple hides job titles of ex-employees, reclassifies them all as 'associates'

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#AppleToo organizer Cher Scarlett says she failed to get a new job because Apple unilaterally changes ex-employees' job titles, meaning her resume no longer tallied with Apple's records.

Before she left Apple, Cher Scarlett was an early founder of the #AppleToo movement. Since leaving, she's argued against Apple attempting to get her to sign an NDA, and has now also revealed a peculiar business practice at the company.

According to The Washington Post, once someone leaves the company, Apple revises the public record of their job title. Regardless of their actual job title while employed, Apple reportedly changes it always and only read "Associate."

Possibly it's a secrecy move to make it harder to determine patterns if certain related groups of people leave at the same time. But regardless of Apple's reasons, Scarlett says that the result is that a company rescinded its job offer to her.

Reportedly, a job verification service was unable to verify her resume because of the change. The verification was delayed by almost a week, and during that time, the company withdrew its job offer.

The Washington Post reports that an Apple spokesperson confirmed that the firm has changed job titles to associate "for years," but did not provide an explanation.

"We are and have always been deeply committed to creating and maintaining a positive and inclusive workplace," the spokesperson told the publication. "We take all concerns seriously and we thoroughly investigate whenever a concern is raised and, out of respect for the privacy of any individuals involved, we do not discuss specific employee matters."

Separately, US state treasurers have asked the SEC to investigate Apple's use of NDAs with employees, as described by Scarlett.