Apple files regulatory docs for mysterious internal network adapter [u]

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Apple has filed regulatory documents with the Federal Communications Commission for a low-power network adapter that it says is intended for internal use only.

The filing, published during a routine update of the FCC's database, covers a low-power Wi-Fi transmitter that operates below 1 GHz. In practical terms, that likely means use of the 802.11ah protocol used for Internet of Things applications.

While most of the documents in the filing are concealed under a confidentiality agreement, a regulatory label reveals the codename "Meerkat" and a model number of A2282. Neither the codename nor the product number are currently associated with a released Apple product.

Credit: FCC

According to a Class A Justification document provided in the filing, the device is a "proprietary network adapter" that is intended to be used in factories, offices and Apple Stores and not to be sold to consumers. The letter also states that the device's purpose is to "optimize recognition or addition of a trusted device for security purpose."

Based on the information, it appears that the device in question is like some type of IoT security or authentication system to be used internally at Apple offices and locations. Like for consumer products, Apple also requires authorization for internal equipment, such as a proprietary door access badge reading system that was revealed in a 2017 FCC filing.

Update: In further regulatory filings, it has been revealed that the device sports an Ethernet port, a Lightning connector, antenna and an integrated battery. It also comes with 32GB internal storage and 1GB RAM. A filing with Taiwan's National Communications Commission, seen by Mysmartprice also revealed its form factor: a small rectangular and nondescript brick.