#AppleToo organizer is no longer withdrawing her NLRB complaint against Apple

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Former Apple engineer and #AppleToo organizer Cher Scarlett is reversing course, stating that she is no longer withdrawing her National Labor Relations Board complaint against Apple because the company didn't execute their end of the deal in good faith.

Previously, Scarlett planned to drop her NLRB complaint after reaching a settlement with the company. At the same time, she also left the company.

Now, Scarlett tells Forbes that Apple failed to execute in good faith its agreement to publicly acknowledge employees rights to discuss salaries.

"One of the requests I made was for there to be a very public, visible affirmation that employees are allowed to discuss their workplace conditions and compensation, both internally and externally," she told the media outlet.

Although Apple did publish language on its internal Human Resources page acknowledging the right, Scarlett says that the text was "only up for a week" when staffers were off for Thanksgiving break. On the following Monday, it was removed.

Additionally, the #AppleToo organizer claims that Apple refused to make a number of changes to the settlement document requested by the NLRB. That included a clause in Apple's proposed settlement document requesting Scarlett "not solicit, encourage or incite anyone to file any charge or complaint with any administrative agency or Court against Apple" for one year.

The aforementioned "private settlement" between Apple and Scarlett included a one-year severance. Given that Scarlett is no longer withdrawing her NLRB complaint, it's likely that Apple won't make pay out the beverage in full.

Scarlett is the founder of the #AppleToo movement, which sought to bring to light issues within the company such as workplace conditions and discrimination.