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Monday, May 07, 2012, 03:18 pm PT (06:18 pm ET)

Apple reveals security specifics of iOS 5.1.1 update

Following the release of Apple's iOS 5.1.1 update for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, the company refreshed its support webpage regarding the new software's security tweaks which include one Safari browser and two WebKit fixes.

Monday's iOS 5.1.1 rollout brought various bug fixes including HDR reliability and network switching, though the initial release note failed to mention what security changes made on the backend.

From the updated Support page:
iOS 5.1.1 Software Update
Safari

Available for: iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, iPod touch (3rd generation) and later, iPad, iPad 2

Impact: A maliciously crafted website may be able to spoof the address in the location bar

Description: A URL spoofing issue existed in Safari. This could be used in a malicious web site to direct the user to a spoofed site that visually appeared to be a legitimate domain. This issue is addressed through improved URL handling. This issue does not affect OS X systems.

CVE-ID

CVE-2012-0674 : David Vieira-Kurz of MajorSecurity (majorsecurity.net)

WebKit

Available for: iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, iPod touch (3rd generation) and later, iPad, iPad 2

Impact: Visiting a maliciously crafted website may lead to a cross-site scripting attack

Description: Multiple cross-site scripting issues existed in WebKit.

CVE-ID

CVE-2011-3046 : Sergey Glazunov working with Google's Pwnium contest

CVE-2011-3056 : Sergey Glazunov

WebKit

Available for: iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, iPod touch (3rd generation) and later, iPad, iPad 2

Impact: Visiting a maliciously crafted website may lead to an unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution

Description: A memory corruption issue existed in WebKit.

CVE-ID

CVE-2012-0672 : Adam Barth and Abhishek Arya of the Google Chrome Security Team

The fixes take care of an issue first discovered in March that allowed a malicious website to display a custom URL that is different than a website's actual address. The spoofing technique could have been used to trick users into unknowingly handing over sensitive information like credit card numbers.